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Terry Pratchett

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Offline bookworm72 Reading Naked In Knightsbridge
03 Oct 2010, 11:00 AM | Post: #1

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Terry Pratchett

I have heard so many people talk about the Discworld series and was wondering if anybody on here has read them. Can you tell me how many are in the series and in what order they should be read and most importantly what you thought of them.
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Offline licenced Reading Apocalypse Troll (David Weber)
03 Oct 2010, 12:19 PM | Post: #2

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RE: Terry Pratchett

Wow, there must be about seventy four thousand disc world books by now at the rate he seems to churn them out. I did read quite a few at the beginning - they are very enjoyable, but after a while I found they started getting just very slightly repetitive. I read a recent one (Unseen Academicals) and more of the same - enjoyable, but almost seen it before.

So, yes, I would recommend you read some, but don't buy them all at once and try to slog through them :-)

I don't think there's any real need to read them in order - they're not a series as such, just all set in the same world and using some of the same characters. So it is probably beneficial to read the earlier ones first. His bibliography and order of book releases is on his website

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Offline Jaxom Reading 33AD, The Time Hunters and Immortal
03 Oct 2010, 01:34 PM | Post: #3

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RE: Terry Pratchett

Ignore the first two books until you have read a few. Start with Mort and then read Equal rites or Reaper man. That will start you off with a good understanding of the Disc. You can then go back to the first two and then read the rest in the order they were writen.
Offline Daphne Reading Wanted by Tim Arnot
03 Oct 2010, 03:14 PM | Post: #4

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RE: Terry Pratchett

This post was last modified: 03 Oct 2010 03:15 PM by Daphne.
(03 Oct 2010 01:34 PM)Jaxom Wrote:  Ignore the first two books until you have read a few. Start with Mort and then read Equal rites or Reaper man. That will start you off with a good understanding of the Disc. You can then go back to the first two and then read the rest in the order they were writen.

This is exactly the right advice. I started with Colour of Magic and found it weird and disjointed - like a colourful idea explosion, and it put me off Pratchett for a while. Then I tried Mort and Reaper Man which were brilliant. Death is just my favourite character (sorry, Anthropomorphic Personification). There are also a set of books based on the City Watch - Guard! Guards!, Men at Arms, Feet of Clay, Jingo, The Fifth Elephant, Night Watch and Thud. These are excellent, in fact I'd set Night Watch up as one of the best books ever written. I bought Unseen Academicals on Kindle and enjoyed it, but the aforementioned are my favourites.
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RE: Terry Pratchett

This post was last modified: 03 Oct 2010 03:45 PM by Terra.
I love Terry Pratchett's discworld books, they're something I indulge in for pure enjoyment every so often, and that I'll keep buying as treebooks so I have something physically of them.

There's currently 38 discworld books, they started in 1983, but as said before, they don't need to be read sequentially, they nearly all work as standalones set in the same universe.

They do follow a rough time line for the whole world, Colour of Magic is the first and sees the discworld in a sort of middle ages time, while the most recent Unseen Academicals and I Shall Wear Midnight are almost 20th century, but ages move much faster on the discworld, that shift happens in about 100 years and being a magical world, a lot of the same characters are still about. It's often called the mirror of worlds, but it's a bit like one of those carnival distorting mirrors sometimes!

They can be roughly broken up into 'The Wizards/Rincewind series', 'The Guards series', 'The Witches series', 'Death/Susan StoHelit series', 'Tiffany Aching series', 'Moist Von LipWig series' and the standalones. That's just to say that those are the primary characters in those particular books, so it helps to read them chronologically, but is not necessary at all!

The Tiffany Aching books are aimed more at children/young adults, but if you get into discworld, they're as worth reading as the rest of them.

I drift from different characters being my favourites, but I lean towards Sam Vimes of the Guards series being the best character, and Guards, Guards! could make a good place to jump in. The Guards/City Watch series has my top favourite discworld books in, especially Jingo which I've giggled through way too many times!

For all the negatives said about Colour of Magic, it's where I got introduced to the discworld and Rincwind, and I couldn't put it down, it got me hooked perfectly. I still have a very soft spot for Rincewind. You do have to read it with Light Fantastic though, they should really be one book as they are a two parts of the same story.

The wiki page might help you decide where might be the best place for you to start as I find the thing or character that draws people in is different dependant on the person.
Offline bookworm72 Reading Naked In Knightsbridge
03 Oct 2010, 05:25 PM | Post: #6

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RE: Terry Pratchett

Thank you all for your replies, I think I will add some to my wish list.
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Offline plumboz Reading Wonder Boys
05 Oct 2010, 03:59 PM | Post: #7

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RE: Terry Pratchett

(03 Oct 2010 05:25 PM)bookworm72 Wrote:  Thank you all for your replies, I think I will add some to my wish list.

The first Pratchett I read was "Going Postal" and I was hooked. I will also say that some of my favorites by Pratchett are the books he has written for the younger crowd. His Tiffany Aching books are wonderful and the Wee Free Men books are enormous fun.

Has anyone mentioned "Good Omens", the huge cult classic Terry Pratchett cowrote with Neil Gaimen? That is one of my All Time Favorites.
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Offline licenced Reading Apocalypse Troll (David Weber)
05 Oct 2010, 06:35 PM | Post: #8

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RE: Terry Pratchett

"Good Omens" was one of the first ever adult (as in not for kids) books I bought for myself. Great read as a I remember - although for some reason I always remembered it as being written by one of the two guys that wrote Red Dwarf. You are of course right, and have prompted me to read it again at some point - I still have it from way back then. I see it's not available on Kindle - at least through Amazon UK.

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RE: Terry Pratchett

This post was last modified: 05 Oct 2010 09:20 PM by Terra.
(05 Oct 2010 03:59 PM)plumboz Wrote:  I will also say that some of my favorites by Pratchett are the books he has written for the younger crowd. His Tiffany Aching books are wonderful and the Wee Free Men books are enormous fun.

Mine too, the Nac Mac Feegle are just...! His non-discworld Bromeliad series ( Truckers, Diggers and Wings) is also a great enjoyable read. I have a lovely hard back of it, though it's a bit on the heavy side! Reading them through is great as the characters' world is slowly expanded from the miniscule (literally) outwards, a bit like that sequence where a camera focuses on one person then pulls further and further out to the town, the country, the planet, the solar system etc.

I dig into his "younger crowd" books with as much enjoyment as those aimed at adults. They're not aimed down, and the stories aren't dumbed down, just some of the concepts are taken a bit wider. Oh and the heroes are smaller Big Grin
Offline plumboz Reading Wonder Boys
09 Oct 2010, 06:02 AM | Post: #10

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RE: Terry Pratchett

There aren't many famous people in this world I would go out of my way to try to meet. Terry Pratchett is one of the few. I'd just like to thank him for doing what he does and wish him well. For me as a writer he's a hero.
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Alan Hutcheson
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