Welcome, Guest! Why not create a free forum account today and join in with the world's friendliest bunch of Kindle enthusiasts

A Wolf in Berlin - Operation Red Comet (Review Opportunity)

Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
Offline John H. Williams Reading Maxico Set, Len Deighton
11 Nov 2016, 06:43 PM | Post: #1

Junior Member
**

Posts: 4
Joined: Nov 2016

Thanked 0 times

What I Read

A Wolf in Berlin - Operation Red Comet (Review Opportunity)

'A Wolf in Berlin - Operation Red Comet' is a Crime & Spy Thriller set in Berlin at the height of the Cold War and has 240 pages.  It was published on Amazon on 12 October and details will be found at: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01M5AM6RB  Further details, photos and videos will be found on my website:  http://www.johnhwilliamsauthor.com 

I am looking for reviewers for this novel and look forward to hearing from you by PM, copies of the book are available to each reviewer.

The book is based on a real incident which was one of the greatest intelligence coups of the Cold War:
At the height of the Cold War, a Soviet Yak-28P Jet Fighter Interceptor fitted with the latest top secret radar interception system, crashed into a Lake in the British Sector of West Berlin.  Whilst the British military mount a salvage operation, the Russians make an armed incursion into the British Sector with the aim of preserving their aircraft’s secrets.
The Russians plan to retrieve the secret radar component and activate a sleeper agent at the British HQ, and send top KGB Agent `Alexander’, into West Berlin.
A Military Policeman and his German girlfriend are blackmailed into assisting an East German Stasi intelligence cell, and after recovering the aircraft’s secret radar component for them, they are killed.
Wolf, a detective from the Special Investigation Branch is brought in to carry out a covert Investigation and is involved in a gun battle with a Stasi Agent in the American Sector, resulting in the death of four US CID agents and the Stasi Agent. 

A joint SIB, US CID and Intelligence task force is set up to track down the enemy agents, but amidst the gunfire and explosions, can Wolf prevent the Soviets retaining their technical superiority. 


Attached File(s) Thumbnail(s)
   
---

Junior Member
**

Posts: 10
Joined: May 2015

Thanked 0 times

What I Read

RE: A Wolf in Berlin - Operation Red Comet (Review Opportunity)

I wish you good luck with that, It certainly has a great mixture of plot assets and opportunities.

I too have ventured into the Cold War but at an earlier juncture and from a completely different angle. Book four in the 'Spits and Spooks' quartet takes me into the soviet infiltration of the British secret services. I am sorry that I have no time to review at the moment - my 1st novel in the series seems to be developing its own traction and I am furiously trying to finish the second and also build a blog and web presence.

I read the sample - if there's a criticism it's that it didn't engage me until chapter two. The prologue if anything detracted because it told me what had happened. Chapter two told it again, but with a human perspective and drew me in. From there on, it engaged me. Kindle is a cruel marketplace and the maxim of engaging the reader in the first few paragraphs seems to apply more there than anywhere else. Reviews will help. Good luck in getting those reviews, I suspect they'll be decent and sales will follow. Have you read http://www.kuforum.co.uk... ?
Grace Risata posts a link to her blog in her first posting - it is advice I'll be following when I get to the stage of proactive promotion.

On a technical note. I read your 'look inside' on Amazon and see it features page numbering. Is this a straight 'lift' for the sample from the print book?

Wishing you every success with what seems a superbly researched piece of fiction,

Bryn
Offline John H. Williams Reading Maxico Set, Len Deighton
16 Nov 2016, 06:09 PM | Post: #3

Junior Member
**

Posts: 4
Joined: Nov 2016

Thanked 0 times

What I Read

Wink RE: A Wolf in Berlin - Operation Red Comet (Review Opportunity)

(16 Nov 2016 11:55 AM)Bryn Rhidian Wrote: Wrote:  I wish you good luck with that, It certainly has a great mixture of plot assets and opportunities.

I too have ventured into the Cold War but at an earlier juncture and from a completely different angle. Book four in the 'Spits and Spooks' quartet takes me into the soviet infiltration of the British secret services. I am sorry that I have no time to review at the moment - my 1st novel in the series seems to be developing its own traction and I am furiously trying to finish the second and also build a blog and web presence.

I read the sample - if there's a criticism it's that it didn't engage me until chapter two. The prologue if anything detracted because it told me what had happened. Chapter two told it again, but with a human perspective and drew me in. From there on, it engaged me. Kindle is a cruel marketplace and the maxim of engaging the reader in the first few paragraphs seems to apply more there than anywhere else. Reviews will help. Good luck in getting those reviews, I suspect they'll be decent and sales will follow. Have you read http://www.kuforum.co.uk... ?
Grace Risata posts a link to her blog in her first posting - it is advice I'll be following when I get to the stage of proactive promotion.

On a technical note. I read your 'look inside' on Amazon and see it features page numbering. Is this a straight 'lift' for the sample from the print book?

Wishing you every success with what seems a superbly researched piece of fiction,

Bryn
Hi Bryn,
Thanks for the feedback and advice, I will bear it in mind for the second novel in the Trilogy, which I am currently researching.  As far as the Prologue was concerned I agree with you and probably would not do it again.  In this instance I felt it was necessary to tell the real story of the crash and the heroic sacrifice of the Pilot and Weapons Officer before fictionalizing the incident, which only forms a small part in the story.

The Grace Risata posting was very interesting.  Regarding page numbering, yes, it is a direct lift from the print version.

Good luck with your next booK!
John
---

Junior Member
**

Posts: 10
Joined: May 2015

Thanked 0 times

What I Read

RE: A Wolf in Berlin - Operation Red Comet (Review Opportunity)

(16 Nov 2016 06:09 PM)John H. Williams Wrote: Wrote:  
(16 Nov 2016 11:55 AM)Bryn Rhidian Wrote: Wrote:  I wish you good luck with that, It certainly has a great mixture of plot assets and opportunities.

I too have ventured into the Cold War but at an earlier juncture and from a completely different angle. Book four in the 'Spits and Spooks' quartet takes me into the soviet infiltration of the British secret services. I am sorry that I have no time to review at the moment - my 1st novel in the series seems to be developing its own traction and I am furiously trying to finish the second and also build a blog and web presence.

I read the sample - if there's a criticism it's that it didn't engage me until chapter two. The prologue if anything detracted because it told me what had happened. Chapter two told it again, but with a human perspective and drew me in. From there on, it engaged me. Kindle is a cruel marketplace and the maxim of engaging the reader in the first few paragraphs seems to apply more there than anywhere else. Reviews will help. Good luck in getting those reviews, I suspect they'll be decent and sales will follow. Have you read http://www.kuforum.co.uk... ?
Grace Risata posts a link to her blog in her first posting - it is advice I'll be following when I get to the stage of proactive promotion.

On a technical note. I read your 'look inside' on Amazon and see it features page numbering. Is this a straight 'lift' for the sample from the print book?

Wishing you every success with what seems a superbly researched piece of fiction,

Bryn
Hi Bryn,
Thanks for the feedback and advice, I will bear it in mind for the second novel in the Trilogy, which I am currently researching.  As far as the Prologue was concerned I agree with you and probably would not do it again.  In this instance I felt it was necessary to tell the real story of the crash and the heroic sacrifice of the Pilot and Weapons Officer before fictionalizing the incident, which only forms a small part in the story.

The Grace Risata posting was very interesting.  Regarding page numbering, yes, it is a direct lift from the print version.

Good luck with your next booK!
John
Hi John,

Good luck with getting some decent reviews. It's something I will have to address myself. My own marketing plan doesn't kick in until my 3rd book in the (currently quartet) is published.

I understand the prologue dilemma. I wrote a 'Single' length romance 'One Alpha Male'.  I didn't intend to write a romance, the story started as a tale about a powerful car. The characters took over and it got 'worse' - I ended up with a romance with a 'working class' hero who uses Yorkshire dialect featuring classic cars and some car terminology. I spent two days putting a glossary of terms and dialect in the suffix and a page of web links to some of the cars featured.

Book 3 in the Spits & Spooks series will contain something similar - Brief descriptions of the London Holding Pen, Trent Park, Bletchley Park, Enigma, Ultra, Bodyguard and Operation Fortitude will feature in some form of suffix. 

In 'One Alpha Male' I explained the use of 'Love' as a form of address between strangers in Northern Britain: not required for most Brits but I could see an American or someone with English as a second language struggling with it.  Just as I could see the hero refurbishing a brake caliper being a mystery to many readers so along with a list of dialect and slang I explained some components. It got worse - I had to translate common British car terms into those used by our American cousins. Not easy at times this writing malarkey Big Grin.
Offline John H. Williams Reading Maxico Set, Len Deighton
17 Nov 2016, 05:33 PM | Post: #5

Junior Member
**

Posts: 4
Joined: Nov 2016

Thanked 0 times

What I Read

RE: A Wolf in Berlin - Operation Red Comet (Review Opportunity)

(17 Nov 2016 11:11 AM)Bryn Rhidian Wrote: Wrote:  
(16 Nov 2016 06:09 PM)John H. Williams Wrote: Wrote:  
(16 Nov 2016 11:55 AM)Bryn Rhidian Wrote: Wrote:  I wish you good luck with that, It certainly has a great mixture of plot assets and opportunities.

I too have ventured into the Cold War but at an earlier juncture and from a completely different angle. Book four in the 'Spits and Spooks' quartet takes me into the soviet infiltration of the British secret services. I am sorry that I have no time to review at the moment - my 1st novel in the series seems to be developing its own traction and I am furiously trying to finish the second and also build a blog and web presence.

I read the sample - if there's a criticism it's that it didn't engage me until chapter two. The prologue if anything detracted because it told me what had happened. Chapter two told it again, but with a human perspective and drew me in. From there on, it engaged me. Kindle is a cruel marketplace and the maxim of engaging the reader in the first few paragraphs seems to apply more there than anywhere else. Reviews will help. Good luck in getting those reviews, I suspect they'll be decent and sales will follow. Have you read http://www.kuforum.co.uk... ?
Grace Risata posts a link to her blog in her first posting - it is advice I'll be following when I get to the stage of proactive promotion.

On a technical note. I read your 'look inside' on Amazon and see it features page numbering. Is this a straight 'lift' for the sample from the print book?

Wishing you every success with what seems a superbly researched piece of fiction,

Bryn
Hi Bryn,
Thanks for the feedback and advice, I will bear it in mind for the second novel in the Trilogy, which I am currently researching.  As far as the Prologue was concerned I agree with you and probably would not do it again.  In this instance I felt it was necessary to tell the real story of the crash and the heroic sacrifice of the Pilot and Weapons Officer before fictionalizing the incident, which only forms a small part in the story.

The Grace Risata posting was very interesting.  Regarding page numbering, yes, it is a direct lift from the print version.

Good luck with your next booK!
John
Hi John,

Good luck with getting some decent reviews. It's something I will have to address myself. My own marketing plan doesn't kick in until my 3rd book in the (currently quartet) is published.

I understand the prologue dilemma. I wrote a 'Single' length romance 'One Alpha Male'.  I didn't intend to write a romance, the story started as a tale about a powerful car. The characters took over and it got 'worse' - I ended up with a romance with a 'working class' hero who uses Yorkshire dialect featuring classic cars and some car terminology. I spent two days putting a glossary of terms and dialect in the suffix and a page of web links to some of the cars featured.

Book 3 in the Spits & Spooks series will contain something similar - Brief descriptions of the London Holding Pen, Trent Park, Bletchley Park, Enigma, Ultra, Bodyguard and Operation Fortitude will feature in some form of suffix. 

In 'One Alpha Male' I explained the use of 'Love' as a form of address between strangers in Northern Britain: not required for most Brits but I could see an American or someone with English as a second language struggling with it.  Just as I could see the hero refurbishing a brake caliper being a mystery to many readers so along with a list of dialect and slang I explained some components. It got worse - I had to translate common British car terms into those used by our American cousins. Not easy at times this writing malarkey Big Grin.
Hi Bryn,
I concur, there must be an easier way, I have been thinking of perhaps re-writing the Prologue into the actual story rather than have it is a stand alone element and then publishing it as the 2nd Edition.  Perhaps the answer is to learn from famous writers such as Len Deighton, he doesn't seem to explain anything in detail i.e in London Match he mentions the BfV quite often.  I have spent quite a lot of time in Germany and know that it is the Bundesamt für Verfassungsschutz, however, it is also the Bavarian Football Association!  Maybe that is the way forward, explain as little as possible and leave to the reader to research what is not understood, even if they come with a Football Association rather than the Office for the Protection of the Constitution!Cool
---

Junior Member
**

Posts: 10
Joined: May 2015

Thanked 0 times

What I Read

RE: A Wolf in Berlin - Operation Red Comet (Review Opportunity)

(17 Nov 2016 05:33 PM)John H. Williams Wrote: Wrote:  
(17 Nov 2016 11:11 AM)Bryn Rhidian Wrote: Wrote:  
(16 Nov 2016 06:09 PM)John H. Williams Wrote: Wrote:  
(16 Nov 2016 11:55 AM)Bryn Rhidian Wrote: Wrote:  I wish you good luck with that, It certainly has a great mixture of plot assets and opportunities.

I too have ventured into the Cold War but at an earlier juncture and from a completely different angle. Book four in the 'Spits and Spooks' quartet takes me into the soviet infiltration of the British secret services. I am sorry that I have no time to review at the moment - my 1st novel in the series seems to be developing its own traction and I am furiously trying to finish the second and also build a blog and web presence.

I read the sample - if there's a criticism it's that it didn't engage me until chapter two. The prologue if anything detracted because it told me what had happened. Chapter two told it again, but with a human perspective and drew me in. From there on, it engaged me. Kindle is a cruel marketplace and the maxim of engaging the reader in the first few paragraphs seems to apply more there than anywhere else. Reviews will help. Good luck in getting those reviews, I suspect they'll be decent and sales will follow. Have you read http://www.kuforum.co.uk... ?
Grace Risata posts a link to her blog in her first posting - it is advice I'll be following when I get to the stage of proactive promotion.

On a technical note. I read your 'look inside' on Amazon and see it features page numbering. Is this a straight 'lift' for the sample from the print book?

Wishing you every success with what seems a superbly researched piece of fiction,

Bryn
Hi Bryn,
Thanks for the feedback and advice, I will bear it in mind for the second novel in the Trilogy, which I am currently researching.  As far as the Prologue was concerned I agree with you and probably would not do it again.  In this instance I felt it was necessary to tell the real story of the crash and the heroic sacrifice of the Pilot and Weapons Officer before fictionalizing the incident, which only forms a small part in the story.

The Grace Risata posting was very interesting.  Regarding page numbering, yes, it is a direct lift from the print version.

Good luck with your next booK!
John
Hi John,

Good luck with getting some decent reviews. It's something I will have to address myself. My own marketing plan doesn't kick in until my 3rd book in the (currently quartet) is published.

I understand the prologue dilemma. I wrote a 'Single' length romance 'One Alpha Male'.  I didn't intend to write a romance, the story started as a tale about a powerful car. The characters took over and it got 'worse' - I ended up with a romance with a 'working class' hero who uses Yorkshire dialect featuring classic cars and some car terminology. I spent two days putting a glossary of terms and dialect in the suffix and a page of web links to some of the cars featured.

Book 3 in the Spits & Spooks series will contain something similar - Brief descriptions of the London Holding Pen, Trent Park, Bletchley Park, Enigma, Ultra, Bodyguard and Operation Fortitude will feature in some form of suffix. 

In 'One Alpha Male' I explained the use of 'Love' as a form of address between strangers in Northern Britain: not required for most Brits but I could see an American or someone with English as a second language struggling with it.  Just as I could see the hero refurbishing a brake caliper being a mystery to many readers so along with a list of dialect and slang I explained some components. It got worse - I had to translate common British car terms into those used by our American cousins. Not easy at times this writing malarkey Big Grin.
Hi Bryn,
I concur, there must be an easier way, I have been thinking of perhaps re-writing the Prologue into the actual story rather than have it is a stand alone element and then publishing it as the 2nd Edition.  Perhaps the answer is to learn from famous writers such as Len Deighton, he doesn't seem to explain anything in detail i.e in London Match he mentions the BfV quite often.  I have spent quite a lot of time in Germany and know that it is the Bundesamt für Verfassungsschutz, however, it is also the Bavarian Football Association!  Maybe that is the way forward, explain as little as possible and leave to the reader to research what is not understood, even if they come with a Football Association rather than the Office for the Protection of the Constitution!Cool

Hi John,

Deighton is an excellent 'mentor'. Bomber (a masterful novel IMO and his best) contains extensive suffixes. He used one to detail the development of the Wurzberg and Freya radar networks, the opera houses, beacons and German night fighter system. It is superb and gave the novel itself the capacity to breathe without technical overload. His research was second to none. He went on to use much of his material in the factual 'Fighter' . I think your ideas on this have 'legs'.
Offline John H. Williams Reading Maxico Set, Len Deighton
18 Nov 2016, 04:02 PM | Post: #7

Junior Member
**

Posts: 4
Joined: Nov 2016

Thanked 0 times

What I Read

RE: A Wolf in Berlin - Operation Red Comet (Review Opportunity)

Hi Bryn,
Reviews are important but seemingly difficult to obtain.  Why don't you finish the review of my book 'A Wolf in Berlin' and I will review one of yours?
John
---
Offline David Erskine
13 Jan 2018, 08:56 PM | Post: #8

Junior Member
**

Posts: 1
Joined: Jan 2018

Thanked 0 times

RE: A Wolf in Berlin - Operation Red Comet (Review Opportunity)

Hello John,
Happy to read and review your book.
Just released my book "The Provenance Diary", set in contemporary times, but driven by events in Cold War Berlin. I'm about to post the forum seeking reviews.
Look forward to hearing from you.
David
http://www.daviderskine.com
---

Currently Reading:Maxico Set, Len Deighton Last Book I Read:A Wolf in Berlin - Operation Red Comet Favourite Genres:Crime & Spy Thrillers
Currently Reading:Across the River and into the Trees -Ernest Hemingway Last Book I Read:Shirley - Charlotte Bronte Favourite Genres:Good literature.